Feng Shui Garden - Tips from Master Boon

Feng shui in your garden: practical tips from an expert

Feng Shui is energy in a space that affects our physical, mental and emotional wellbeing. So Feng Shui exists not only in homes and buildings but also in our outdoor/garden space.

Gardens have a multitude of function and look.  However, not many people are aware to use Feng Shui for function and look.  Feng Shui principles used in a garden has the function of harnessing positive energies to benefit everyone that uses the garden space.  Also, it will provide a more harmonising and balanced aesthetics to the garden. 

My Traditional Feng Shui knowledge and skills can be applied to any scale or scope of landscape design – from a miniature garden like my courtyard garden to property development and urban landscape design. Similar to the interior of living and work spaces, I lay out the landscape space with particular attention to directing the flow of energies.

Complex systems and formulae are used to determine where the positive and negative energies reside. With skilful means I direct, harness and enhance these energies through the use of harmonising materials and colours, judicious placement of water features, strategic directing flow of waterways and pathways.  All this to bring about the enriching powers of Feng Shui.

I can create a calming or uplifting sense depending on the Feng Shui outcome you desire. It is all in the Feng Shui design and is independent of any size or style of garden. Feng Shui design can be applied on a large suburban garden to a small apartment balcony garden, ornamental or native, low maintenance or cottage garden, water garden or rock garden.

However, there are some simple things that you can do yourself that will bring about a sense of wellbeing and harmony. Stuff life & Style published my interview with NZ Gardener editor Mei Leng Wong in the article below.

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