Feng Shui might

The Star Lifestyle, November 8, 2005
Feng Shui might

By Majorie Chew


Halfway through a feng shui course, a woman started weeping. The alarmed feng shui grandmaster later found out the cause of her sadness. The woman was convinced that if she had taken the course earlier, she could have saved the lives of her husband, an in-law and a maid. “The woman’s home was orientated with negative feng shui. The house was on a slope with the front higher than the back, lacking protection from the four celestial animals land formation. The land form enhanced the inauspicious stars of the Flying Stars system,” recounts Melbourne-based feng shui consultant, master Boon Yap, in an interview in Kuala Lumpur. “Furthermore, the use of the rooms and directions where energy enters were particularly wrong for these three East Life Gua people. The worst was the main door which spelt ‘life asunder’ for her husband.”
The husband had knocked a hole in the compound’s retention wall to clear a waterlogged area. The direction in which water flowed out violated one of the water systems of feng shui which spelt disaster for the household. The wife did not perish because the feng shui of the house was not so bad for her.” Boon was told the tragic story which took place six years ago by her father, feng shui grandmaster Yap Cheng Hai. In another incident, a woman consulted Yap who told her to renovate the front door of her house to protect the household from sha qi or negative forces that enter their property.  According to San He feng shui, this sha qi was consistent with the Eight Killing Forces formation known to cause blood-related disasters, accidents or murders.  Three months later, the woman and her husband died after being shot by their son. Upon investigation, the woman had not renovated her house as advised. Feng shui classics say that when malevolent energies lie unchecked coupled with a sudden onslaught from more malevolent forces, fatalities may result. Boon believes the two tragedies could have been averted if the principles of feng shui were observed. Boon runs a business consultancy in strategic marketing and international business development for the biomedical industry throughout Asia Pacific. She is back in Malaysia briefly to run two study retreats – Feng Shui Practitioner’s Courses: Elementary (Nov 18 to 20) and Intermediate (Nov 25 to 27) at Avillion Port Dickson, Negri Sembilan.  The feng shui principles that are cited here will be taught by Boon in her forthcoming courses so that participants can have a better understanding of how they work. Feng shui can take on auspicious and inauspicious aspects of different qualities. For example, if we tap relationship qi, the auspicious aspect is harmony, affection or devotion. Inadvertently tapping its inauspicious aspect can lead to adultery. Boon says: “Let’s say a house is sitting on the West and facing the East and there is a road or ‘water’ (river or drain) coming in from the North. If the feng shui of the house is unfavourable to you, you may experience a Peach Blossom Killing (either spouse will commit adultery). “There are other feng shui principles that need to be checked to ensure they are not violated,” she says with a laugh. “That’s when one has to be feng shui savvy.” In Six Harms situation, if the door is facing the North, the killing direction is from the South West.  “You must not have a road or water source coming in from this direction or there will be no peace in the household. You may make plenty of money but your family won’t get along and there will be fighting among the siblings,” warns Boon. The most amusing feng shui story Boon told was about a catering manager who was made redundant at the age of 55.  “Back home without a job, the man ended up being nagged by his wife. A good samaritan friend who could not bear to see the husband moping around at home, sought my advice,” says Boon. “The couple’s bedroom was good for the wife but not the husband. The bed was also in an argumentative position. Both agreed a reprieve from each other was not a bad thing so I placed him in a spare study room where the feng shui was better for him.” The man’s bed was placed in a slanting position and orientated to almost the exact one degree to tap good energy according to several schools of feng shui. Boon further advised him to enter by the side door. “Two weeks later, the man got a job as a catering manager of a high society club,” says Boon. Three months later, the man resigned because of personality clashes. When Boon was consulted again, she asked: “Did you move anything?” That’s when the cat was let out of the bag. A friend came visiting and stayed in his room. Too self-conscious of the slanting position of his bed, he decided to move the bed against the wall. When the friend left, he did not move the bed back to the orientated direction and hence, he could not tap the good energy. After two weeks, the man called Boon, saying that he was going to run a kopitiam business. “Business is so good that I was told he doesn’t allow anyone to touch his bed,” quips Boon.  Boon then recounted the story of the good samaritan friend (the one who helped the catering manager). Knowing a bit of feng shui, he drove his wife crazy by changing things around the house.  After he changed his bed position, he argued with a neighbour. When he did it a second time, he was involved in a car accident. When he tried to move things in his son’s room, he and his son almost got hit by a car if not for his quick reflexes. Out of despair, he finally called Boon.  

Boon found the cause of all his woes and reprimanded him: “Why did you go looking for trouble? You’re chasing the monthly Five Yellow”. Five Yellow is the name of the Star No.5 responsible for calamities. “Flying stars are time-dependant energies that migrate to different sectors of the house on an annual, monthly and daily basis.  “If a property is not grounded on good feng shui, these energies can trigger negative events. Conversely, when the good stars ‘fly’ into a sector, they can bring good luck.” Boon was asked to help the man’s young wife build a career. The wife was advised to use another entrance to their bungalow, the rice cooker was positioned for prosperity and her bed relocated for harmony. After the consultation, she got a promotion. Work and feng shui aside, Boon recharges herself by travelling the world and experiencing the many wonders of nature.  “I don’t go to the gym or exercise for the sake of it as I find that too boring. I need to be outside. I feel alive hiking through the mountains,’’ says Boon, who has trekked through the Rockies in Canada, climbed the Dolomites in northern Italy, backpacked on the Great Walks in South Island New Zealand, explored the Mulu Caves in Malaysia and hiked through most of the alpine areas in South-Eastern Australia.  She has also dived in favourite spots along the Victorian coast, Great Barrier Reef, the Philippines, Thailand and South Pacific islands. Most recently, she camped in the wilds of South Africa and soaked in the power of the mountains at Machu Picchu, the spiritual site of the Incas that is located high in the Andes Mountains in Peru. 
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Boon Yap soaking in the power of the mountains at Machu Picchu, the royal retreat and spiritual site of the Incas.

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